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image: Puncturing the Myth

Puncturing the Myth

By | September 1, 2011

Purinergic signaling, not mystical energy, may explain how acupuncture works.

100 Comments

image: The Cytokine Cycle

The Cytokine Cycle

By | September 1, 2011

The initiating cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown. However, from our studies it’s clear that many types of neuronal damage—­­from traumatic brain injury, to epilepsy, infection, or genetic predisposition—­can activate brain immune cells—microglia and astrocytes-- promoting them to produce IL-1 and S100 inflammatory cytokines.

12 Comments

image: Blood’s Role in the Aging Brain

Blood’s Role in the Aging Brain

By | August 31, 2011

A blood protein involved in allergy contributes to the decline in brain function and memory in aging mice.

18 Comments

image: Hiding Under a Cap

Hiding Under a Cap

By | August 30, 2011

Editor's Choice in Immunology

0 Comments

image: Soldiers' Amygdalae Show Scars

Soldiers' Amygdalae Show Scars

By | August 30, 2011

A year and a half after soldiers have returned from war, impairments in the regulatory circuitry of the amygdala remain.

9 Comments

image: Top 7 in Neuroscience

Top 7 in Neuroscience

By | August 23, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in neuroscience, from Faculty of 1000

0 Comments

image: Next Generation: Electronic Skin

Next Generation: Electronic Skin

By | August 17, 2011

Tiny, flexible electronic chips embedded in a skin-like material monitor vitals and stimulate muscles.

3 Comments

image: Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

By | August 9, 2011

More than 100 researchers have left a neuroscience institute in Brazil in the last couple of weeks, protesting managerial problems they say are thwarting their work.

21 Comments

image: A Chronic Lyme Biomarker?

A Chronic Lyme Biomarker?

By | August 8, 2011

Researchers identify an antibody profile that may mark patients who suffer persistent symptoms of the tick-borne disease.

6 Comments

image: Rats Don't Map Altitude

Rats Don't Map Altitude

By | August 8, 2011

Rat neurons only weakly respond as the animals climbed upwards, suggesting the brain's map of the environment doesn't account for altitude.

9 Comments

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