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image: Foresight

Foresight

By | July 1, 2011

Studying the earliest events in visual development, Carla Shatz has learned the importance of looking at one’s data with open eyes—and an open mind.

12 Comments

image: Harmit Malik: Viral Historian

Harmit Malik: Viral Historian

By | July 1, 2011

Member, Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. Age: 38

3 Comments

image: Color by Number Fossils

Color by Number Fossils

By | June 30, 2011

Researchers map pigments in early bird fossils using preserved metallic residues.

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image: Warm-Blooded Dinos?

Warm-Blooded Dinos?

By | June 24, 2011

Evidence that large dinosaurs had body temperatures similar to modern-day mammals suggests they were either endothermic or extremely good at conserving body heat.

3 Comments

image: Escape Predators, Get Parasites

Escape Predators, Get Parasites

By | June 24, 2011

A particular predator defense used by water fleas makes them more susceptible to parasite infections, new research shows.

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image: Behavior brief

Behavior brief

By | June 23, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research.

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image: Bigger spores = badder infection

Bigger spores = badder infection

By | June 17, 2011

Larger spores of a deadly fungal pathogen cause more virulent infections in mice.

3 Comments

image: Gould's bias

Gould's bias

By | June 16, 2011

A new study finds that Stephen J. Gould's criticisms of another scientist's data was misplaced, and the eminent biologist and historian succumbed to data bias himself.

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image: Our own 60 mutations

Our own 60 mutations

By | June 15, 2011

New estimates of human mutation suggest that each of us harbor approximately 60 novel genetic mutations.

4 Comments

image: The Axis of Aging

The Axis of Aging

By | June 14, 2011

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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