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image: Bird Rests Both Brain Hemispheres During Flight

Bird Rests Both Brain Hemispheres During Flight

By Tracy Vence | August 8, 2016

Great frigatebirds can sleep while flying, researchers report.

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image: Do Schizophrenic Brains Repair Themselves?

Do Schizophrenic Brains Repair Themselves?

By Jef Akst | August 1, 2016

Preliminary research suggests that the brains of schizophrenia patients may regain tissue mass as the illness wears on.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By Bob Grant | August 1, 2016

Idiot Brain, Wild Sex, Why Diets Make Us Fat, and The Ethics of Invention

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image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By Katherine S. Pollard | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

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image: On Becoming Human

On Becoming Human

By Mary Beth Aberlin | August 1, 2016

Some thoughts on going to the Galápagos

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image: Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

By Jacqueline R. Dillard and David F. Westneat | August 1, 2016

Why does cooperation evolve most often in monogamous animals?

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image: Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

By João Pedro de Magalhães | August 1, 2016

The modern human brain evolved in social and environmental settings very unlike today’s. Despite our cultural and technological progress, tribal instincts remain.

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A chloroplast mutation has dramatically affected the genomes of railside populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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image: The Death of Diets

The Death of Diets

By The Scientist Staff | August 1, 2016

Book author and neuroscientist Sandra Aamodt discusses her own struggle with her weight and the science behind breaking the cycle of gain and loss.

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image: The Hormones and Brain Regions Behind Eye Contact

The Hormones and Brain Regions Behind Eye Contact

By Robert Lavine | August 1, 2016

Can oxytocin help increase eye contact in patients with autism, thus opening up a whole new world of social interaction?

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