The Scientist

» physiology, immunology and microbiology

Most Recent

The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

0 Comments

image: Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

By Kerry Grens | April 26, 2017

CLARITY made mouse bones transparent while preserving fluorescent labels so researchers could visualize tagged osteoprogenitors.

0 Comments

image: Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

By Bob Grant | April 17, 2017

The fast-flying insects convert sugars from nectar into antioxidants, which can help heal the oxidative damage suffered by their hard-working muscles.

0 Comments

A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

0 Comments

Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 6, 2017

A common, seemingly benign human virus can trigger an immune response that leads to celiac disease in a mouse model, researchers show. 

3 Comments

Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

By Rachel Berkowitz | April 1, 2017

Using biocompatible polymers to carry cancer immune therapies directly to the tumor

0 Comments

image: Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

By Catherine Offord | April 1, 2017

Following a spate of patient deaths in clinical trials testing modified T cells for the treatment of cancer, researchers work to reduce the treatment’s toxicity without sacrificing efficacy.

0 Comments

image: Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

By Stephen P. Schoenberger and Ezra Cohen | April 1, 2017

Tumors’ mutations can encode the seeds of their own destruction, in the form of immunogenic peptides recognized by T cells.

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Two University of Rochester Professors Resign in Protest
  2. Dartmouth Professor Investigated for Sexual Misconduct Retires
  3. Theranos Leaders Indicted For Fraud
    The Nutshell Theranos Leaders Indicted For Fraud

    Federal prosecutors filed criminal charges that allege the company’s promise to revolutionize blood testing swindled investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars and put patients in danger.

  4. Koko the Signing Gorilla Dies at 46