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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By Shawna Williams | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

By Ruth Williams | June 29, 2017

A small, placenta-produced peptide fixes the pregnancy-related condition in mice. 

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By Ashley Yeager | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Bone Marrow Isn’t the Only Source of Platelets

Bone Marrow Isn’t the Only Source of Platelets

By Ashley P. Taylor | June 1, 2017

Scientists have estimated that about half of murine platelet production occurs in the lungs.

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By Catherine Offord | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By Rachel Berkowitz | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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image: Running on Empty

Running on Empty

By Bob Grant | June 1, 2017

Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

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image: Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

By Andrea Anderson | June 1, 2017

In the 1960s, immunologists took matters into their own hands—and under their own skin—to characterize an immunoglobulin involved in allergies.

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