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» DNA methylation and developmental biology

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Epigenetic Changes in Cancer

By | March 1, 2011

The study of how covalent marks on DNA and histones are involved in the origin and spread of cancer cells is also leading to new therapeutic strategies.

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The Mark of Faith

By | March 1, 2011

Testing a central tenet of epigenetic regulation

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image: Epigenetics and Society

Epigenetics and Society

By | March 1, 2011

Did Erasmus Darwin foreshadow the tweaking of his grandson’s paradigm?

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Ready, Reset, Go

By | March 1, 2011

Rudolf Jaenisch enjoys climbing mountains, rafting rapids, and unraveling the secrets of pluripotency—knowledge that could someday lead to personalized regenerative medicine.

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image: Epigenetics—A Primer

Epigenetics—A Primer

By | March 1, 2011

There are many ways that epigenetic effects regulate the activation or repression of genes. Here are a few molecular tricks cells use to read off the right genetic program.

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image: Epigenetics—A Primer

Epigenetics—A Primer

By | March 1, 2011

Epigenetic events regulate the activities of genes without changing the DNA sequence. Different genes are expressed depending on the methyl-marks attached to DNA itself and by changes in the structure and/or composition of chromatin. 

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Environmental Impact

By | March 1, 2011

Research in behavioral epigenetics is seeking evidence that links experience to biochemistry to gene expression and back out again.

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Imprinting Diversity

By | March 1, 2011

Joachim Messing talks about how genomic imprinting may be a strong driver of diversity.

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Losers Fight Back

By | February 1, 2011

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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Myc, Nicked

By | January 1, 2011

Editor's Choice in Developmental Biology

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