Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Infection Imaging

Image of the Day: Infection Imaging

By The Scientist Staff | March 22, 2018

A new technique could allow researchers to better understand bacteria-host interactions over the course of an infection.

0 Comments

A study finds that the vaccine’s effects wear off as a person ages, suggesting a need for booster shots.

1 Comment

image: Image of the Day: Nuclear Pore Complex

Image of the Day: Nuclear Pore Complex

By The Scientist Staff | March 20, 2018

The structure has a stress-resilient architecture reminiscent of suspension bridges.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Puzzle Plants

Image of the Day: Puzzle Plants

By The Scientist Staff | March 19, 2018

The jigsaw-shape cells found in the epidermis of many plants may serve to reduce mechanical stress on cell walls.

0 Comments

image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  

0 Comments

In response to short DNA fragments, lymphocytes release mitochondrial DNA that helps trigger an immune response.

0 Comments

image: Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

By Anna Azvolinsky | March 1, 2018

After discovering a novel organelle found in protozoan parasites, the University of Pennsylvania’s Roos created a widely used eukaryotic pathogen database.

0 Comments

image: Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

By Vikramjit Lahiri and Daniel J. Klionsky | March 1, 2018

New details of the molecular process by which our cells consume themselves point to therapeutic potential.

4 Comments

image: Infographic: From Sediments to Sequences

Infographic: From Sediments to Sequences

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

How to analyze ancient proteins

0 Comments

image: Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies

Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies

By Kerry Grens | February 28, 2018

Previously considered immobile, these cells swoop in to seal epithelial holes and clean up cellular detritus.  

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How to Separate the Science From the (Jerk) Scientist
  2. Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?
  3. Sweden Cancels Agreement With Elsevier Over Open Access
  4. Prevalent Form of Childhood Leukemia May Be Preventable