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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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Clinical medicine and biosciences are among the UK disciplines that receive the most EU funding.

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image: Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

By | May 15, 2017

Men have traditionally stolen the spotlight as scientific popularizers on TV, but women are making names for themselves in other formats.

6 Comments

image: Macron’s Election Win Cheered by Scientists

Macron’s Election Win Cheered by Scientists

By | May 8, 2017

The future French president’s goals are pro-science, yet he will need parliamentary support.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | April 1, 2017

Eugene Garfield, the cancer moonshot, employee genetic testing, and more

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image: UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

By | March 24, 2017

The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

3 Comments

image: San People Write Ethical Code for Research

San People Write Ethical Code for Research

By | March 21, 2017

With lifestyles similar to our hunter-gatherer ancestors, the San people of Southern Africa are popular study subjects.

2 Comments

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