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In response to short DNA fragments, lymphocytes release mitochondrial DNA that helps trigger an immune response.

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image: Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

By Anna Azvolinsky | March 1, 2018

After discovering a novel organelle found in protozoan parasites, the University of Pennsylvania’s Roos created a widely used eukaryotic pathogen database.

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image: Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

By Vikramjit Lahiri and Daniel J. Klionsky | March 1, 2018

New details of the molecular process by which our cells consume themselves point to therapeutic potential.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | March 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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The animal pictures and hand stencils were made in caves in Spain thousands of years before Homo sapiens arrived in Europe.

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image: Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

By Ruth Williams | February 15, 2018

Stem cells and cancer cells have enough molecular similarities that the former can be used to trigger immunity against the latter.

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image: Image of the Day: Tardigrades!

Image of the Day: Tardigrades!

By The Scientist Staff | February 13, 2018

The microscopic water bears will be featured in an exhibition at the Harvard Museum of Natural History beginning Saturday, February 17.

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Reductions from the budget passed today and a $750-million shift of funds to the Children’s Health Insurance Program add pressure to public health initiatives, including immunizations and outbreak responses.

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image: Bacteriophages Plentiful in Women’s Bladders

Bacteriophages Plentiful in Women’s Bladders

By Abby Olena | February 2, 2018

In one of the first looks at the urinary virome, researchers find hundreds of viruses, most of which have never been sequenced before. 

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The test uses levels of plasma amyloid-β to estimate the buildup of protein plaques in the brain.

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