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International agencies responded quickly to the crisis, but some public health officials say the world may not be ready for a bigger outbreak.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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The antibodies bind conserved viral parts, allowing them to neutralize all five Ebola types.

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image: Two Confirmed Cases of Ebola in Congo

Two Confirmed Cases of Ebola in Congo

By | May 15, 2017

More than a dozen other individuals are suspected of infection in the central African nation.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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