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image: Malaria Pipeline Biggest Ever

Malaria Pipeline Biggest Ever

By Jef Akst | June 29, 2011

A new report suggests that potential malaria treatments currently under study comprise the largest drug pipeline in history.

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image: Gene Editing Treats Blood Disease

Gene Editing Treats Blood Disease

By Annie Gottlieb | June 27, 2011

Revising a dysfunctional gene in vivo for the first time, researchers successfully restore blood clotting in hemophiliac mice.

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image: Deadly Trait Combo Arms German <em>E. coli</em>

Deadly Trait Combo Arms German E. coli

By Megan Scudellari | June 27, 2011

The virulent strain that has killed 48 people produces Shiga toxin and sticks to the intestinal wall.

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image: New and Improved Bone Tests

New and Improved Bone Tests

By Tia Ghose | June 23, 2011

Two new approaches to test bone density provide a simpler way to predict risk of osteoporosis.

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image: Mail

Mail

By The Scientist Staff | June 23, 2011

A selection of comments from our readers.

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image: Sleep on it

Sleep on it

By Megan Scudellari | June 23, 2011

Scientists invent a method to control the timing and duration of sleep in fruit flies and find that snoozing helps form long-term memories.

9 Comments

image: Take Two of These

Take Two of These

By Bob Grant | June 22, 2011

Drugmakers are teaming up to test the disease-fighting power of combination therapies earlier in the development cycle than ever before.

3 Comments

image: HPV vaccine shows promise

HPV vaccine shows promise

By Jef Akst | June 22, 2011

An HPV vaccination program in Australia appears to have resulted in a drop in cervical lesions among young women.

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image: Chimp panel biased towards research?

Chimp panel biased towards research?

By Jessica P. Johnson | June 21, 2011

Humane Society accuses a panel tasked with deciding the fate of retired chimpanzees of monkey business.

3 Comments

image: Animal-grown transplant organs?

Animal-grown transplant organs?

By Jef Akst | June 21, 2011

Chimeric mice harboring organs from rats suggest that engineered animals may one day grow human tissues for transplant.

6 Comments

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