Loading...

Most Recent

Pectin fragments may signal plant cells to maintain a type of growth suited to darkness.

0 Comments

image: Viruses Related to Zika May Also Harm Fetuses

Viruses Related to Zika May Also Harm Fetuses

By Ruth Williams | January 31, 2018

Studies in mice suggest that other flaviviruses, such as West Nile virus and Powassan virus, may cause birth defects, too. 

0 Comments

image: “Retired” Mice Find New Life as Top Models for Autism

“Retired” Mice Find New Life as Top Models for Autism

By Jessica Wright | January 29, 2018

After years of obscurity, strains of mice with mutations in particular genes are thrust to the fore of autism research.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Swearing is Good for You</em>

Book Excerpt from Swearing is Good for You

By Emma Byrne | January 24, 2018

In chapter 1, “The Bad Language Brain: Neuroscience and Swearing,” author Emma Byrne sets the scene for her book by telling the story of the hapless and potty-mouthed Phineas Gage.

0 Comments

image: Learning Opens the Genome

Learning Opens the Genome

By Ruth Williams | January 17, 2018

Researchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.

1 Comment

In mice and flies, the Arc protein forms capsids and carries genetic information.

0 Comments

The BMJ inquiry finds that researchers presented only select results from animal experiments when applying for funding and approval for human trials.

0 Comments

Researchers identify patterns of neural activity ranging from a few days to four weeks in individuals with epilepsy.

0 Comments

image: Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

By Abby Olena | January 8, 2018

Three studies—one of mice and two of human genetics—describe the role of two proteins, adenylyl cyclase and melanocortin 4 receptor, in the development of obesity and diabetes. 

2 Comments

image: Image of the Day: See You Later!

Image of the Day: See You Later!

By The Scientist Staff | January 8, 2018

Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow. 

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Salk Institute Suspends Cancer Scientist Inder Verma
  2. Long-Term Study Reveals Flip in Plant Responses to Carbon Dioxide
  3. Jim Bridenstine Confirmed to Lead NASA
  4. RNA Injection Restores Hearing in Guinea Pigs