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image: Infographic: Getting Synapses Ready to Fire

Infographic: Getting Synapses Ready to Fire

By Ashley Yeager | May 1, 2018

A new study reveals more about the role of specialized Schwann cells at junctions between neurons and muscle cells.

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image: How Bacteria Eat Penicillin

How Bacteria Eat Penicillin

By Shawna Williams | April 30, 2018

Scientists work out the specific genes and biochemical steps required for digesting the very drugs designed to kill microbes.

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A new technique reveals certain neuronal connections grow larger and denser when memories are made.

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image: Worms’ Magnetic Sense Questioned

Worms’ Magnetic Sense Questioned

By Abby Olena | April 25, 2018

Unsuccessful attempts to reproduce the results of a 2015 study reporting that C. elegans orient themselves by Earth’s magnetic field spark debate among researchers.

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image: Exercise Warms the Brain, Causing Mice to Eat Less

Exercise Warms the Brain, Causing Mice to Eat Less

By Kerry Grens | April 24, 2018

Directly activating a heat sensor also sensitive to capsaicin in chili peppers in the hypothalamus had the same effect as exercise.

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Rather than getting a gene for its original function, a horizontal gene transfer provides the raw material for evolutionary innovation.

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Drug-free environments, such as a designated ward in a hospital, might reduce the strength of selection for resistance.

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image: Image of the Day: Ant Attack!

Image of the Day: Ant Attack!

By The Scientist Staff | April 24, 2018

A new species of ant discovered in Borneo fends off invaders with a uniquely suicidal strategy.

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image: Male Fruit Flies Take Pleasure in Having Sex

Male Fruit Flies Take Pleasure in Having Sex

By Jim Daley | April 20, 2018

Sex-deprived males seek out alcohol.

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image: Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains

Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains

By Ashley Yeager | April 16, 2018

After implantation, the tissue developed blood vessels and became integrated into neuronal networks in the animals’ brains.

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