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image: Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

By Ruth Williams | July 3, 2014

Scientists show how cell stress both prevents and promotes cell suicide in a study that’s equally divisive.

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image: Magic Mushroom Dreams

Magic Mushroom Dreams

By Jef Akst | July 3, 2014

A psychedelic compound in hallucinogenic mushrooms triggers brain activity characteristic of dream states.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By Jef Akst | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Lichen Legion

Lichen Legion

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | July 2, 2014

Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.

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image: The Rise of Color

The Rise of Color

By Jef Akst | July 1, 2014

An analysis of modern birds reveals that carotenoid-based plumage coloring arose several times throughout their evolutionary history, dating as far back as 66 million years ago.

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image: Accidental Orgasms

Accidental Orgasms

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | July 1, 2014

Meet the researcher struggling to gain approval for his medical device, which was originally designed to relieve back pain, but turned out to be an orgasm inducer.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By Bob Grant | July 1, 2014

Sex on Earth, Wild Connection, The Classification of Sex, and XL Love

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image: Carnal Knowledge

Carnal Knowledge

By Bob Grant | July 1, 2014

Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.

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image: Geni-Tales

Geni-Tales

By Menno Schilthuizen | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

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image: Size Matters

Size Matters

By Tracy Vence | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

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