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image: Fat Saps Muscle

Fat Saps Muscle

By | November 1, 2015

The accumulation of fat within skeletal muscle, as happens with obesity, diminishes muscle performance.

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image: Obesogens

Obesogens

By | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.

3 Comments

image: Bile Benefits

Bile Benefits

By | November 1, 2015

Diverting the bile duct around a long stretch of the small intestine could treat obesity without cutting out chunks of the digestive tract.

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image: Fat Factors

Fat Factors

By | November 1, 2015

A mouse's exposure to certain environmental chemicals can lead the animal—and its offspring and grandoffspring—to be overweight.

1 Comment

image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: Warming Up to Brown Fat

Warming Up to Brown Fat

By | October 8, 2015

Scientists know how to turn on these fat-combusting cells. Can these energy burners be used to combat obesity?

6 Comments

image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

1 Comment

image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

27 Comments

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