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image: Sweet Tooth Gene Tied to Less Body Fat

Sweet Tooth Gene Tied to Less Body Fat

By Kerry Grens | April 11, 2018

A study of more than 450,000 people finds a certain genetic variant associated with eating more carbs is linked to a thicker waist and higher blood pressure, but less fat.  

3 Comments

image: Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies

Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies

By Kerry Grens | February 28, 2018

Previously considered immobile, these cells swoop in to seal epithelial holes and clean up cellular detritus.  

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image: FDA Goes After Two Stem Cell Clinics

FDA Goes After Two Stem Cell Clinics

By Kerry Grens | August 29, 2017

The agency raided one that was using a stem cell-smallpox vaccine combo, and sent a warning to another to obey best practices.

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image: Olfaction Determines Weight in Mice

Olfaction Determines Weight in Mice

By Diana Kwon | July 5, 2017

Animals lacking a sense of smell stayed thinner than their smelling counterparts, despite eating the same amount.

1 Comment

image: Year in Review: Hot Topics

Year in Review: Hot Topics

By Jef Akst | December 21, 2015

In 2015, The Scientist dove deep into the latest research on aging, HIV, hearing, and obesity.

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image: Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet

Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet

By Kate Yandell | November 23, 2015

Researchers should pay closer attention to the diets they use to study obesity in mice, experts advise.

6 Comments

image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By Karen Zusi | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By Kate Yandell | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: Fat Saps Muscle

Fat Saps Muscle

By Tracy Vence | November 1, 2015

The accumulation of fat within skeletal muscle, as happens with obesity, diminishes muscle performance.

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image: Obesogens

Obesogens

By Kerry Grens | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.

3 Comments

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