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image: Copper Connections

Copper Connections

By Jim Daley | May 1, 2018

Researchers initially set out to investigate the relationship between copper homeostasis and the rare Menkes disease, but they also found links to Parkinson’s.

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image: Infographic: From Sediments to Sequences

Infographic: From Sediments to Sequences

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

How to analyze ancient proteins

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image: Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

Researchers are looking to proteins to explore the biology of ancient organisms, from medieval humans all the way back to dinosaurs.

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image: Mapping Brain Proteins

Mapping Brain Proteins

By Devika G. Bansal | February 1, 2018

Researchers are using souped-up mass spectrometry to localize proteins within brain cells.

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image: 2017 Top 10 Innovations

2017 Top 10 Innovations

By The Scientist Staff | December 1, 2017

From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

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image: How Statistics Weakened mRNA’s Predictive Power

How Statistics Weakened mRNA’s Predictive Power

By Ruth Williams | May 22, 2017

Transcript abundance isn’t a reliable indicator of protein quantity, contrary to studies’ suggestions. 

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image: Single-Celled Life Primed to Go Multicellular

Single-Celled Life Primed to Go Multicellular

By Bob Grant | October 17, 2016

The unicellular ancestor of animals may have harbored some of the molecular tools that its many-celled descendants use to coordinate and direct cell differentiation and function, scientists show.

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image: Enhancing Vaccine Development

Enhancing Vaccine Development

By Wudan Yan | June 1, 2016

Using proteomics methods to inform antigen selection

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image: Practical Proteomes

Practical Proteomes

By Ruth Williams | January 1, 2016

Cell type–specific proteomic analyses are now possible from paraffin-embedded tissues.

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image: Sleepy Squirrels

Sleepy Squirrels

By The Scientist Staff | January 1, 2016

Visit the lab of Matthew Andrews at the University of Minnesota Duluth, who studies hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels to learn how their hearts manage extreme temperature fluctuations.

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