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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Brave Genius</em>

Book Excerpt from Brave Genius

By Sean B. Carroll | November 1, 2013

In Chapter 20, “On the Same Path,” author Sean Carroll describes the initial meeting between Nobel Laureates Jacques Monod and Albert Camus.


image: Chance and Necessity

Chance and Necessity

By Sean B. Carroll | November 1, 2013

War and justice brought together two of the greatest minds of the 20th century, a scientist and a writer.

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image: Contributors


By Abby Olena | November 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: The Neuron Doctrine, circa 1894

The Neuron Doctrine, circa 1894

By Chris Palmer | November 1, 2013

Santiago Ramón y Cajal used a staining technique developed by Camillo Golgi to formulate the idea that the neuron is the basic unit of the nervous system.

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image: The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

By Kate Yandell | October 1, 2013

A scientist’s desperate attempts to prove that Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy landed him on trial, but his insights into the disease’s pathology were eventually vindicated.


image: Lords of the Fly, circa 1910

Lords of the Fly, circa 1910

By Dan Cossins | September 1, 2013

In a cramped lab overflowing with fruit flies, Thomas Hunt Morgan and his protégés made the discoveries that laid the foundations of modern genetics.


image: Sketching out Cell Theory, circa 1837

Sketching out Cell Theory, circa 1837

By Kate Yandell | August 1, 2013

How a dinner-table conversation between two biologists led to the formulation of the theory that cells are the building blocks of all living organisms.


image: A Fly on the Wall

A Fly on the Wall

By Dan Cossins | July 19, 2013

A geneticist-turned-filmmaker is making a movie set in Columbia University’s famous Fly Room, where the foundations for modern genetics were laid.


image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By Edyta Zielinska | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.


image: The Elixir Tragedy, 1937

The Elixir Tragedy, 1937

By Jef Akst | June 1, 2013

A mass poisoning of 105 patients treated with an untested medication spurred Congress to empower the US Food and Drug Administration to monitor drug safety.


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