The Scientist

» Mars and evolution

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

By The Scientist Staff | December 4, 2017

Factors such as humidity and temperature can affect how Rhinolophus clivosus use echolocation. 

0 Comments

Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.

2 Comments

image: Infographic: The Hazards of Life on Mars

Infographic: The Hazards of Life on Mars

By Diana Kwon | December 1, 2017

High levels of radiation, among other health risks, challenge the future colonation of the Red Planet.

0 Comments

image: Search for Life on the Red Planet

Search for Life on the Red Planet

By Diana Kwon | December 1, 2017

Growing evidence points to a once-habitable world—and recent findings suggest that life could exist on Mars today.

0 Comments

image: Hundreds of Pterosaur Eggs Discovered in China

Hundreds of Pterosaur Eggs Discovered in China

By Kerry Grens | November 30, 2017

The fossil booty includes some eggs with embryo remains inside, and points to group nests involving long-term parental care.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Ice Age Horse 

Image of the Day: Ice Age Horse 

By The Scientist Staff | November 29, 2017

Scientists have identified a new genus of extinct horse that lived in North America during the last ice age. 

0 Comments

The 10-micrometer-long flagellate cell might have a big story to tell about the evolution of eukaryotes.

0 Comments

image: Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

By Katarina Zimmer | November 2, 2017

The Tapanuli orangutan has been identified as the newest species of great ape, but also likely the most endangered. 

0 Comments

image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By Mary Bates | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

1 Comment

image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By The Scientist Staff | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer
  2. Love in the Scientific Literature
    News Analysis Love in the Scientific Literature

    There are countless ways for scientists to say, “I love you.” Naming a slime-mold beetle after your wife (and another after your ex-wife) is, apparently, one of them.  

  3. Nobel Prize–Winning Biologist Dies
  4. CDC: Flu Vaccine 36 Percent Effective So Far
AAAS