Most Recent

image: CRISPR–Enabled Epigenome Editing

CRISPR–Enabled Epigenome Editing

By Kerry Grens | April 6, 2015

Researchers apply the genome-editing technology to alter histones at distant gene enhancers, controlling gene expression.


image: Studying Ebola Survivors

Studying Ebola Survivors

By Amanda B. Keener | April 6, 2015

A scientist jumps at the chance to study the blood of four Ebola survivors to better understand how the immune system responds to the deadly virus. 

1 Comment

image: Enzyme Improves CRISPR

Enzyme Improves CRISPR

By Kerry Grens | April 1, 2015

A smaller Cas9 protein enables in vivo genome engineering via viral vectors.


image: Cancer Immunotherapist

Cancer Immunotherapist

By Jef Akst | April 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Yvonne Saenger explains recent advances in using biomarkers to identify cancer patients who might benefit most from immunotherapy.

1 Comment

image: Contributors


By Jenny Rood | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.


image: Getting Your Sugar Fix

Getting Your Sugar Fix

By Kate Yandell | April 1, 2015

A guide to glycan microarrays

1 Comment

image: In Custody

In Custody

By Wudan Yan | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

1 Comment

image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By Jenny Rood | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.


image: Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

By Jef Akst | April 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University. Age: 41


image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By Elena E. Giorgi | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?


Popular Now

  1. Elena Rybak-Akimova, Chemical Kinetics Expert, Dies
  2. University of Oregon Erecting a $1-Billion Science Center
  3. Investigation Finds Signs of Misconduct in Swedish Researcher’s Papers
  4. Opinion: No, FDA Didn’t Really Approve 23andMe’s <em>BRCA</em> Test