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Puzzle Me This

By Graeme Stemp-Morlock | February 1, 2011

What substance is supposed to have no effect but can make people feel better, has no chance for a big monetary payoff but is worth billions, and is used in virtually every rigorous clinical trial but has no single, universal formulation? 

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Appealing Choice

By Erika Lorraine Milam | January 1, 2011

A book is born from pondering why sexual selection was, for so long, a minor component of evolutionary biology.

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Eau de Choice

By Richard P. Grant | January 1, 2011

Evolutionary biologist Jane Hurst at the University of Liverpool has found that male mice have evolved a cunning trick to distinguish themselves within the dating pool: they produce a specific protein that drives female attraction to male scent, and this molecule, called darcin, helps females remember a specific male's odor.

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Garage Innovation

By Rob Carlson | January 1, 2011

The potential costs of regulating synthetic biology must be counted against putative benefits.

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Synthetic Spirits

By David Nutt | January 1, 2011

Can we use science to reduce the harms of alcohol?

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Proteins Adorned

By Amy Maxmen | January 1, 2011

Cracking the Secrets of Posttranslational Modifications

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Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

By L. Caetano M. Antunes, Julian E. Davies and B. Brett Finlay | January 1, 2011

As much as rainforests or deep-sea vents, the human gut holds rich stores of microbial chemicals that should be mined for their pharmacological potential.

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Myc, Nicked

By Richard P. Grant | January 1, 2011

Editor's Choice in Developmental Biology

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Basophil Roles

By Richard P. Grant | January 1, 2011

Editor's choice in Immunology

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Interfering with Cancer

By Katherine Hyde and Paul Liu | January 1, 2011

MicroRNAs may drive the development of leukemia.

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