The Scientist

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Contributors

By | August 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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Metagenomics Mash-Up

By | August 1, 2014

A tour of the newest software and strategies for analyzing microbial and viral communities

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Say "Aaaah"

By | August 1, 2014

Scientists aim to remotely monitor Parkinson’s through voice recordings.

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Seeds of Hopelessness

By | August 1, 2014

Can seed banks adequately prepare for the future if wild plant populations are already lagging behind in adapting to rapid climate change?

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Small Packages

By | August 1, 2014

When proverbs come true

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Stressing and FRETing

By | August 1, 2014

Two labs have produced FRET-based systems for real-time analysis of a plant stress hormone.

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Tailoring Your Proteome View

By | August 1, 2014

Computational tools can streamline the development of targeted proteomics experiments.  

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A Vaulted Mystery

By | August 1, 2014

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of tiny barrel-shape structures called vaults, their natural functions remain elusive. Nevertheless, researchers are beginning to put these nanoparticles to work in biomedicine.

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Nanomedicine

By , , and | August 1, 2014

From bioimaging to drug delivery and therapeutics, nanotechnology is poised to change the way doctors practice medicine.

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image: The Body’s Ecosystem

The Body’s Ecosystem

By | August 1, 2014

Research on the human microbiome is booming, and scientists have moved from simply taking stock of gut flora to understanding the influence of microbes throughout the body.

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