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image: Next-Gen Sequencing User Survey

Next-Gen Sequencing User Survey

By | November 1, 2014

Outsourcing is still the rule and data analysis, the bottleneck.

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image: The Body Electric, 1840s

The Body Electric, 1840s

By | November 1, 2014

Emil du Bois-Reymond’s innovations for recording electrical signals from living tissue set the stage for today’s neural monitoring techniques.

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image: The Ever-Transcendent Cell

The Ever-Transcendent Cell

By | November 1, 2014

Deriving physiologic first principles

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: White’s the Matter

White’s the Matter

By | November 1, 2014

A basic guide to white matter imaging using diffusion MRI

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image: Rapid Evolution in Real Time

Rapid Evolution in Real Time

By | October 23, 2014

On islands off the coast of Florida, scientists uncover swift adaptive changes among Carolina anole populations, whose habitats were disturbed by the introduction of another lizard species.

8 Comments

image: Electromagnetism Promotes Pluripotency: Study

Electromagnetism Promotes Pluripotency: Study

By | October 23, 2014

A paper published last month claims that electromagnetic exposure facilitates cell reprogramming, but some scientists question the evidence.

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image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

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image: Ancient Sex

Ancient Sex

By | October 19, 2014

Fossils of an extinct, armored fish challenge current understanding of when copulation and internal fertilization evolved in jawed vertebrates.

3 Comments

image: New Genes = New Archaea?

New Genes = New Archaea?

By | October 15, 2014

Genes acquired from bacteria contributed to the origins of archaeal lineages, a large-scale phylogenetic analysis suggests.

1 Comment

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