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image: New Suspect in <em>E. coli</em> Deaths

New Suspect in E. coli Deaths

By Jessica P. Johnson | July 6, 2011

Fenugreek seeds are banned in Europe after authorities point the finger at them as a potential source of the deadly E. coli outbreak.

6 Comments

image: C-ing with the Lights Out

C-ing with the Lights Out

By Richard P. Grant | July 1, 2011

I the dark Arctic shallows one research finds heterotrophic marine bacteria doing a surprising amount of carbon fixing.

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image: Probiotic Protection

Probiotic Protection

By Richard P. Grant | July 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in microbiology

12 Comments

image: Trading Pelts for Pestilence

Trading Pelts for Pestilence

By Jef Akst | July 1, 2011

When European explorers and fishermen began to frequent Canada’s shores in the 16th century, they brought with them a plethora of tools and trinkets, including knives, axes, kettles, and blankets. 

6 Comments

image: One Bad Apple

One Bad Apple

By Richard P. Grant | June 24, 2011

A unique virus and the worm it infects turn up in an orchard outside of Paris.

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image: Top 7 in immunology

Top 7 in immunology

By Edyta Zielinska | June 21, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in immunology and related areas, from Faculty of 1000.

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image: Lobster-Pot Science

Lobster-Pot Science

By Richard P. Grant | June 13, 2011

Microbiologist Marvin Whiteley chats about teaming up with chemist and bioengineer Jason Shear in order to build tiny houses for bacteria.

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image: Honey bee microbiome probed

Honey bee microbiome probed

By Bob Grant | June 9, 2011

Researchers reveal several new viruses lurking in healthy hives.

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image: A new cow-borne superbug

A new cow-borne superbug

By Bob Grant | June 7, 2011

As Germany grapples with an E. coli outbreak, a new strain of MRSA appears in Europe.

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image: One-Man NIH, 1887

One-Man NIH, 1887

By Cristina Luiggi | June 4, 2011

As epidemics swept across the United States in the 19th century, the US government recognized the pressing need for a national lab dedicated to the study of infectious disease. 

27 Comments

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