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image: EPA’s Scott Pruitt Doesn’t Buy Evolution

EPA’s Scott Pruitt Doesn’t Buy Evolution

By Kerry Grens | March 5, 2018

In audio files from 2005, the future Administrator of the EPA said there’s a lack of “sufficient scientific facts” to back the theory.

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image: Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

Researchers are looking to proteins to explore the biology of ancient organisms, from medieval humans all the way back to dinosaurs.

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image: Image of the Day: DNA Knitter

Image of the Day: DNA Knitter

By The Scientist Staff | February 27, 2018

Researchers show how condensin complexes organize DNA in real time.

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image: Image of the Day: Size Matters

Image of the Day: Size Matters

By The Scientist Staff | February 23, 2018

The male proboscis monkey’s large nose probably evolved in response to female preference and competition between males.

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image: Bats May Have Taken on Viruses To Stay in Flight

Bats May Have Taken on Viruses To Stay in Flight

By Ashley Yeager | February 23, 2018

Dampening the immune response to stay up in the air may have helped bats become tolerant to viral infections.

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A closer moon and ideal coastal conditions for tide pool formation may have started the evolutionary transition of tetrapods.

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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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image: A Brush with Inheritance, 1878

A Brush with Inheritance, 1878

By Catherine Offord | February 1, 2018

Lampbrush chromosomes, first observed in the 19th century, still offer an unparalleled glimpse into how genetic information is organized in the cell.

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image: An Enduring Partnership

An Enduring Partnership

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2018

Humanity would be nothing without plants. It’s high time we recognize their crucial role in sustaining life on Earth.

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Over the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.

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