Loading...

The Scientist

» settlers, genetics & genomics and neuroscience

Most Recent

image: Lasting Intelligence

Lasting Intelligence

By Cristina Luiggi | January 19, 2012

Genetic differences influence how well people perform on IQ tests as children and senior citizens.

0 Comments

image: Low Oxygen Saves Irradiated Brain?

Low Oxygen Saves Irradiated Brain?

By Hannah Waters | January 18, 2012

Whole brain radiation therapy costs mice some of their cognitive abilities, but treatment with low-oxygen air revives their reasoning skills.

9 Comments

image: Same Day Genomes

Same Day Genomes

By Megan Scudellari | January 13, 2012

Two new sequencing machines will read a human genome in 24 hours.

24 Comments

image: Early Signs of Alzheimers

Early Signs of Alzheimers

By Tia Ghose | January 13, 2012

Proteins that appear before patients show symptoms of the disease could offer clues to the disease process.

0 Comments

image: Ever Wonder…

Ever Wonder…

By Jef Akst | January 10, 2012

How does catnip work?

3 Comments

image: Animal Mind Control

Animal Mind Control

By Jef Akst | January 1, 2012

Examples of parasites that manipulate the behavior of their hosts are not hard to come by, but scientists have only recently begun to understand how they induce such dramatic changes.

40 Comments

Resolving Chronic Pain

By Claudia Sommer and Frank Birklein | January 1, 2012

The body’s own mechanism for dispersing the inflammatory reaction might lead to new treatments for chronic pain.

76 Comments

image: Top Ten Innovations 2011

Top Ten Innovations 2011

By The Scientist Staff | January 1, 2012

Our list of the best and brightest products that 2011 had to offer the life scientist

5 Comments

image: Roanoke Revisited

Roanoke Revisited

By Kerry Grens | January 1, 2012

In July 1587, a British colonist named John White accompanied 117 people to settle a small island sheltered within the barrier islands of what would become North Carolina’s Outer Banks. 

0 Comments

image: Cat Cravings

Cat Cravings

By Jef Akst | January 1, 2012

A mutated feline receptor for sweet tastes explains why cats don’t love sugar but do dig mushrooms.

36 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Estonia Offers Free Genetic Testing to Residents
  2. Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains
  3. The Second March for Science a Smaller Affair
  4. RNA Injection Restores Hearing in Guinea Pigs