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image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By The Scientist Staff | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.


image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By Mary Beth Aberlin | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century


image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By Anna Azvolinsky | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.


image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By Jenny Rood | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By Janice Dietert and Rodney Dietert | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.


image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By Bob Grant | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.


image: Touchy Feely

Touchy Feely

By Kerry Grens | June 1, 2015

Physical contact helps determine who’s present among baboons’ gut bacteria.


image: WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

By Tracy Vence | May 27, 2015

World Health Organization officials endorse a global strategy to combat the spread of antibiotic resistance.


image: Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

By Kerry Grens | May 19, 2015

The midwestern U.S. and central Asia are at high risk for new disease outbreaks from pathogen-bearing rodents, according to a study.

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image: Maturation of the Infant Microbiome

Maturation of the Infant Microbiome

By Kerry Grens | May 13, 2015

Gut microbial communities from breastfed babies are slow to resemble adults’ microbiota.


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