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image: C-ing with the Lights Out

C-ing with the Lights Out

By | July 1, 2011

I the dark Arctic shallows one research finds heterotrophic marine bacteria doing a surprising amount of carbon fixing.

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Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2011

Solar, The Dark X, The Sky's Dark Labyrinth, Spiral

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image: For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls

By | July 1, 2011

Eleanor Simpson on how dopamine helps rats learn and may lead humans to addiction.

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image: Best in Academia, 2011

Best in Academia, 2011

By | July 1, 2011

Meet some of the finalists of this year's Best Places to Work in Academia survey. 

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image: Book excerpt from <em>Pox: An American History</em>

Book excerpt from Pox: An American History

By | July 1, 2011

In Chapter 5, "The Stable and the Laboratory," author Michael Willrich explores the burgeoning vaccine manufacture industry that ramped up to combat smallpox epidemics in turn-of-the-twentieth-century American cities.

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image: Foresight

Foresight

By | July 1, 2011

Studying the earliest events in visual development, Carla Shatz has learned the importance of looking at one’s data with open eyes—and an open mind.

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image: Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

By | July 1, 2011

This animation illustrates optogenetics—a radical new technology for controlling brain activity with light. 

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image: Scientist to Watch

Scientist to Watch

By | July 1, 2011

“This is my trophy,” says biologist Michael Edidin, walking across his office at Johns Hopkins University to pick up two oversized clock hands, once part of the stately clock tower that still stands on the Baltimore campus. 

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Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2011

July 2011's selection of notable quotes

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image: Trading Pelts for Pestilence

Trading Pelts for Pestilence

By | July 1, 2011

When European explorers and fishermen began to frequent Canada’s shores in the 16th century, they brought with them a plethora of tools and trinkets, including knives, axes, kettles, and blankets. 

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