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Their $1.5 billion bid, which topped Thermo Fisher Scientific’s $1.3 billion offer for the genetic analysis company, was rejected.

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image: Origins of Dysentery

Origins of Dysentery

By | March 22, 2016

A new genomic analysis reveals that the pathogen responsible for the gastrointestinal disease likely originated in Europe and hitched a ride to new lands with settlers.

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image: CRISPR Can Tag RNA

CRISPR Can Tag RNA

By | March 21, 2016

Modifications to the DNA-slicing program allow for monitoring the movement of messenger RNA.

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image: Study: Genetic Tests Don’t Change Behavior

Study: Genetic Tests Don’t Change Behavior

By | March 17, 2016

Knowing one’s genetic risk for particular diseases doesn’t encourage behavior modifications, according to a study.

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image: Clock Reset on Denisovan-Neanderthal Split

Clock Reset on Denisovan-Neanderthal Split

By | March 14, 2016

Nuclear DNA from 430,000-year-old specimens indicates that Neanderthals had already diverged from their ancient-human predecessors.

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image: Microbial Recycler Found

Microbial Recycler Found

By | March 14, 2016

Researchers discover a new species of bacteria that can break down a commonly used plastic.

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image: CRISPRi-Controlled Gene Expression

CRISPRi-Controlled Gene Expression

By | March 10, 2016

A variation of the gene-editing technique can more precisely and efficiently downregulate the expression of target genes than traditional CRISPR/Cas9.

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image: Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

By | March 3, 2016

On “vaginal seeding” and the challenge of evidence-based parenting

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image: Dragonfly is World-Record Flier

Dragonfly is World-Record Flier

By | March 3, 2016

Researchers have determined that a diminutive insect out-flies all other winged migrators by traveling thousands of miles between continents and across oceans yearly.

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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