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Researchers explore genetic engineering to produce super-tough fibers.

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image: Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

By | October 1, 2017

French revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat took on many roles over the course of his life, including physician and scientist.

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Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.

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Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Damage Patroller

Damage Patroller

By | October 1, 2017

Stephen Elledge has built a career studying how eukaryotic cells maintain genomic integrity.

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image: Drugging the Disorderome

Drugging the Disorderome

By | October 1, 2017

Strategies for targeting intrinsically disordered proteins

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image: Spider Silk

Spider Silk

By | October 1, 2017

Kraig Biocraft Laboratories has genetically engineered a silkworm to spin spider silk, which might be used for futuristic products.

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image: Watch This Biofilm

Watch This Biofilm

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers encoded moving images in DNA within living cells.

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image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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