The Scientist

» Croaton, immunology, disease/medicine and evolution

Most Recent

image: Appealing Choice

Appealing Choice

By | January 1, 2011

A book is born from pondering why sexual selection was, for so long, a minor component of evolutionary biology.

0 Comments

image: Eau de Choice

Eau de Choice

By | January 1, 2011

Evolutionary biologist Jane Hurst at the University of Liverpool has found that male mice have evolved a cunning trick to distinguish themselves within the dating pool: they produce a specific protein that drives female attraction to male scent, and this molecule, called darcin, helps females remember a specific male's odor.

0 Comments

image: Synthetic Spirits

Synthetic Spirits

By | January 1, 2011

Can we use science to reduce the harms of alcohol?

0 Comments

image: Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

By | January 1, 2011

As much as rainforests or deep-sea vents, the human gut holds rich stores of microbial chemicals that should be mined for their pharmacological potential.

0 Comments

image: Basophil Roles

Basophil Roles

By | January 1, 2011

Editor's choice in Immunology

0 Comments

image: Interfering with Cancer

Interfering with Cancer

By | January 1, 2011

MicroRNAs may drive the development of leukemia.

0 Comments

image: Intestinal Molecular Signaling

Intestinal Molecular Signaling

By | January 1, 2011

Microbes, both good and bad, can exert direct effects on host cells and vice versa. 

0 Comments

image: The Evolution of Volvox

The Evolution of Volvox

By | January 1, 2011

The volvocine algae are a model system for studying the evolution of multicellularity, as the group contains extant species ranging from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to a variety of colonial species and the full-fledged multicellular Volvox varieties.

0 Comments

image: Brave New Drugs

Brave New Drugs

By | January 1, 2011

Intoxicating ideas for saving a billion lives

0 Comments

From Simple To Complex

By | January 1, 2011

The switch from single-celled organisms to ones made up of many cells has evolved independently more than two dozen times. What can this transition teach us about the origin of complex organisms such as animals and plants?

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?
  2. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  3. CRISPR to Debut in Clinical Trials
  4. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax