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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By The Scientist Staff | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By Ruth Williams | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Light-Tolerant Tomatoes

Light-Tolerant Tomatoes

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | August 7, 2014

Upping the expression of a single gene improves the plant’s ability to withstand light and increases yields. 

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image: Opinion: Bumblebees in Trouble

Opinion: Bumblebees in Trouble

By Nancy Stamp | June 30, 2014

Commercialization has sickened wild bumblebees around the world. Can we save them? 

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By Bob Grant | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Rusty Waves of Grain

Rusty Waves of Grain

By Kerry Grens | June 1, 2014

See how a ruinous fungus that attacks wheat wreaks its damage.

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image: Wheat Whisperer, circa 1953

Wheat Whisperer, circa 1953

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | June 1, 2014

The Green Revolution of the 20th century began with Norman Borlaug’s development of a short-statured, large-grained wheat.

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