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image: Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

By Katarina Zimmer | November 2, 2017

The Tapanuli orangutan has been identified as the newest species of great ape, but also likely the most endangered. 

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image: Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

The blood-brain barrier is a collection of specialized cells and proteins that control the movement of molecules from the blood to the central nervous system.

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image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By Philip Jaekl | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.

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image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By Mary Bates | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

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image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By The Scientist Staff | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By Steve Graff | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.

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image: Pesticide Residues Linked to Unsuccessful IVF

Pesticide Residues Linked to Unsuccessful IVF

By Kerry Grens | October 30, 2017

Women who ate more produce known to harbor pesticides were less likely to succeed with fertility treatment than women who ate fewer of these fruits and vegetables.

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Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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