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image: Book Excerpt from <em>How to Feed the World</em>

Book Excerpt from How to Feed the World

By Uris Baldos | February 12, 2018

In chapter 5, “The Technology Ticket,” contributing author Uris Baldos urges acceptance and investment in “precision agriculture” to provide for a burgeoning global population.

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image: How Toxic is the World’s Most Popular Herbicide Roundup?

How Toxic is the World’s Most Popular Herbicide Roundup?

By Katarina Zimmer | February 7, 2018

Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, is designed to be toxic to plants, but scientists observe some untoward effects on animals in the lab. 

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image: Image of the Day: Colorado Potato Beetles

Image of the Day: Colorado Potato Beetles

By The Scientist Staff | February 6, 2018

Leptinotarsa decemlineata has been decimating agricultural crops since at least the 19th century, and by sequencing its genome researchers hope to explore new strategies for controlling the pest.

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The test uses levels of plasma amyloid-β to estimate the buildup of protein plaques in the brain.

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We are on the cusp of yet another revolution in how we feed the populace.

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image: An Enduring Partnership

An Enduring Partnership

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2018

Humanity would be nothing without plants. It’s high time we recognize their crucial role in sustaining life on Earth.

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The Purdue University researcher is one of the first to examine the molecular processes that underlie infection by soil microbes.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2018 issue of The Scientist.

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Over the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.

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image: How Viruses Attack Plants

How Viruses Attack Plants

By Claire Asher | February 1, 2018

Viruses are incapable of reproducing without the help of a host, whose cells copy their genetic material and fabricate the building blocks of new virus particles.

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