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image: After Harvey, Mosquito Control Ramps Up

After Harvey, Mosquito Control Ramps Up

By | September 15, 2017

With flooding still several feet high in some parts of Texas, authorities have intensified mosquito control tactics in the hopes of avoiding disease outbreaks.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

By | May 22, 2017

Rare genetic variants could blunt efforts to destroy pest populations. 

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: <em>Wolbachia</em>-infected Mosquitoes Released in Florida

Wolbachia-infected Mosquitoes Released in Florida

By | April 19, 2017

The bacterium causes eggs to die, and spreading treated insects is expected to curb Aedes aegypti populations.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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