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The former chief of Eli Lilly USA is picked to replace Tom Price, who stepped down in September amid a controversy over the abuse of taxpayer-funded travel.


A team has engineered two stem cell lines into “synthetic T cells” that destroy breast cancer cells in vitro. 

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Single-cell analyses from mouse samples detail the changes in cell distribution during infections.


image: Child Receives Transgenic Skin Over Most of His Body

Child Receives Transgenic Skin Over Most of His Body

By Ruth Williams | November 8, 2017

A combination gene-and-cell therapy has given a boy with a grievous skin disease a new lease on life, and has resolved a dermatology debate to boot.


Maintaining dynamic connections among the body’s mitochondria is required for the health and life-extending benefits of low-calorie diets for nematodes.


image: Mass Resignation from <em>Scientific Reports</em>’s Editorial Board

Mass Resignation from Scientific Reports’s Editorial Board

By Catherine Offord | November 7, 2017

Nineteen researchers have stepped down after the journal decided not to retract a paper that they say plagiarized the work of a Johns Hopkins biomedical scientist.


image: Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

By Ashley P. Taylor | November 1, 2017

Soluble adenylyl cyclase measures and responds to pH changes in coral cells, but whether it can help the animals withstand ocean acidification is not yet known.


image: Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

By Sara B. Linker, Tracy A. Bedrosian, and Fred H. Gage | November 1, 2017

Advances in single-cell technologies have revealed vast differences between cells once thought to be in the same category, calling into question how we define cell type in the first place.


image: Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

The blood-brain barrier is a collection of specialized cells and proteins that control the movement of molecules from the blood to the central nervous system.


image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By Philip Jaekl | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.


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