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Researchers use base-editing to swap out an erroneous nucleotide responsible for a potentially life-threatening blood disorder.

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image: Enormous University Gift Raises Questions over Donor Influence

Enormous University Gift Raises Questions over Donor Influence

By Ashley P. Taylor | September 26, 2017

The donation to the University of California, Irvine, is slated to fund a new college focusing on what some critics call pseudoscience and quackery.

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image: In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

By Jef Akst | September 20, 2017

Hundreds of samples from microbes living in the gut, skin, mouth, and vagina add to the human microbiome “fingerprint.” 

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image: Parkinson’s Researcher Notches 17 Retracted Papers

Parkinson’s Researcher Notches 17 Retracted Papers

By Aggie Mika | September 13, 2017

Scientific misconduct motivated Yoshihiro Sato’s three additional retractions last month; his institution doesn’t respond. 

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image: Infection During Pregnancy Tied to Autism in Mouse Model

Infection During Pregnancy Tied to Autism in Mouse Model

By Kerry Grens | September 13, 2017

Bacterial strains in mice’s gut microbiomes mediated their pups’ risk for developing abnormal behaviors.

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image: How Exercise Might Fight Cancer

How Exercise Might Fight Cancer

By Jef Akst | September 8, 2017

Epinephrine’s activation of the signaling pathway Hippo is responsible for the in vitro tumor-fighting effects of serum from women who worked out.

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image: Retractions Damage Scientists’ Reputations: Study

Retractions Damage Scientists’ Reputations: Study

By Aggie Mika | September 8, 2017

Authors of rescinded papers see a 10 percent to 20 percent decline in citation rates for their other publications. 

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image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By Ruth Williams | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

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Exposure to the body’s humidity causes a film of the microbes to change shape, opening flaps in the garment to allow for increased airflow.

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image: Brain Bugs

Brain Bugs

By The Scientist Staff | September 1, 2017

Neuropharmacologist John Cryan of University College of Cork in Ireland explains the links between the microbiome and the central nervous system.

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