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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By The Scientist Staff | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.


image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By Ruth Williams | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: NIH Grant Reviews Don’t Predict Success

NIH Grant Reviews Don’t Predict Success

By Kerry Grens | February 18, 2016

Peer reviewers’ assessments of funding proposals to the National Institutes of Health don’t correlate well with later publication citations, a study shows.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By Karen Zusi | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.


image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By Bob Grant | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.


image: A Literature Database with Smarts

A Literature Database with Smarts

By Kerry Grens | November 3, 2015

Semantic Scholar uses machine reading and vision to extract meaning and impact from academic papers.


image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By Karen Zusi | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.


image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By Kerry Grens | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.


image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By Jef Akst | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.


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