The Scientist

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image: Image of the Day: Size Matters

Image of the Day: Size Matters

By The Scientist Staff | February 23, 2018

The male proboscis monkey’s large nose probably evolved in response to female preference and competition between males.

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image: Bats May Have Taken on Viruses To Stay in Flight

Bats May Have Taken on Viruses To Stay in Flight

By Ashley Yeager | February 23, 2018

Dampening the immune response to stay up in the air may have helped bats become tolerant to viral infections.


A closer moon and ideal coastal conditions for tide pool formation may have started the evolutionary transition of tetrapods.

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image: Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

By Ruth Williams | February 15, 2018

Stem cells and cancer cells have enough molecular similarities that the former can be used to trigger immunity against the latter.

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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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The test uses levels of plasma amyloid-β to estimate the buildup of protein plaques in the brain.

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image: An Enduring Partnership

An Enduring Partnership

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2018

Humanity would be nothing without plants. It’s high time we recognize their crucial role in sustaining life on Earth.

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image: Contributors


By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2018 issue of The Scientist.


Over the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.


image: How Viruses Attack Plants

How Viruses Attack Plants

By Claire Asher | February 1, 2018

Viruses are incapable of reproducing without the help of a host, whose cells copy their genetic material and fabricate the building blocks of new virus particles.


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