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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | May 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Tetracycline Inventor Dies

Tetracycline Inventor Dies

By | March 15, 2017

Lloyd Conover, a longtime chemist at Pfizer, pioneered the concept of chemically altering natural antibiotics to create new drugs.

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image: Unknown Protein Structures Predicted

Unknown Protein Structures Predicted

By | January 19, 2017

Metagenomic sequence data boosts the power of protein modeling software to yield hundreds of new protein structure predictions.

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Certain microbes express genes in a methane-production pathway, offering an explanation for puzzlingly high levels of the gas in some lakes.

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image: Many Evolutionary Paths Lead to Same Bird Trait

Many Evolutionary Paths Lead to Same Bird Trait

By | October 20, 2016

Diverse genetic changes lead to remarkably similar hemoglobin adaptations of diverse bird species, a study finds. 

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image: RNA-Targeting CRISPR

RNA-Targeting CRISPR

By | June 2, 2016

Scientists identify a novel CRISPR system that zeroes in on single-stranded RNA.  

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image: Carolyn Bertozzi: Glycan Chemist

Carolyn Bertozzi: Glycan Chemist

By | June 1, 2016

Bertozzi opens visual windows onto complex sugars on and inside living cells.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Master Folder

Master Folder

By | January 1, 2016

Meet Susan Lindquist, the MIT biologist who has won numerous accolades for her research on protein folding.

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