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image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By Kerry Grens | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By Karen Zusi | November 19, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

By Bobby Bascomb | November 16, 2015

Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 2–6

Week in Review: November 2–6

By Jef Akst | November 6, 2015

How Ebola hides from immune cells; gut microbes’ role in immunotherapy response; new mechanisms of hearing loss; butterflies use milkweed toxins to ward off predators

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image: Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

By Anna Azvolinsky | November 5, 2015

Gut microbiome composition can influence the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy in mice.

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image: A Tiny Missing Link?

A Tiny Missing Link?

By Bob Grant | November 2, 2015

The common ancestor of all apes, including great apes and humans, may have been not-so-great in stature.

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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By Jenny Rood | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

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image: A Complex Disorder

A Complex Disorder

By Stephen D. Hursting, Ciara H. O’Flanagan, and Laura W. Bowers | November 1, 2015

Factors that likely contribute to obesity include disruptions to intercellular signaling, increased inflammation, and changes to the gut microbiome.  

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image: Evolution of the Penis

Evolution of the Penis

By Kerry Grens | October 30, 2015

A phallus-less reptile goes through a developmental stage with external genitalia, suggesting a common origin for the organ among amniotes.

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image: Dogs Originated in Central Asia

Dogs Originated in Central Asia

By Karen Zusi | October 21, 2015

Man’s best friend was domesticated near Nepal and Mongolia at least 15,000 years ago, according to a genetic analysis.

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