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image: Image of the Day: Rainbow Gut

Image of the Day: Rainbow Gut

By | October 11, 2017

Rather than organizing into easily defined compartments, different microbes mix and intermingle within the mouse gut, scientists find.

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image: In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

By | September 20, 2017

Hundreds of samples from microbes living in the gut, skin, mouth, and vagina add to the human microbiome “fingerprint.” 

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image: Infection During Pregnancy Tied to Autism in Mouse Model

Infection During Pregnancy Tied to Autism in Mouse Model

By | September 13, 2017

Bacterial strains in mice’s gut microbiomes mediated their pups’ risk for developing abnormal behaviors.

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image: Hunter-gatherer Microbiomes Cycle with the Seasons

Hunter-gatherer Microbiomes Cycle with the Seasons

By | August 24, 2017

The composition of the gut microbiota varies by time of year and is more diverse than that of industrialized groups.

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image: Seeding the Gut Microbiome Prevents Sepsis in Infants

Seeding the Gut Microbiome Prevents Sepsis in Infants

By | August 16, 2017

An oral mix of a pre- and probiotic can decrease deaths from the condition, according to the results of a large clinical trial conducted in rural India. 

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image: Untreatable Gonorrhea Rising Globally

Untreatable Gonorrhea Rising Globally

By | July 7, 2017

Fifty countries report strains of the bacteria that are resistant to last-resort antibiotics.

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image: Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the Microbiome

Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the Microbiome

By | May 23, 2017

Tests so far typically screen for risky patterns that may augment traditional types of clinical data.

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Scientists hope to save oranges from a bacterial disease that causes citrus greening, a disease that leads to bitter, discolored fruit.

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Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

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SP140, an epigenetic reader protein mutated in a number of autoimmune disorders, is essential for macrophage function and preventing intestinal inflammation, scientists show. 

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