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Contributors

By Jenny Rood | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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From Many, One

By Elena E. Giorgi | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

By Jef Akst | March 27, 2015

A study suggests that the virus may not be evolving as quickly as a previous group estimated.

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Short, Strong Signals

By Ruth Williams | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Oldest <em>Homo</em> Remains Yet Found

Oldest Homo Remains Yet Found

By Ruth Williams | March 4, 2015

A newly discovered 2.8 million-year-old jawbone is thought to be that of a direct human ancestor.

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A Deathly Pallor

By Carina Storrs | March 1, 2015

Global warming could lead to lighter-colored insects with waning immune defenses.

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Capsule Reviews

By Bob Grant | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

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Drunk Monkeys

By Jef Akst | March 1, 2015

UC Berkeley biologist Robert Dudley explains his "drunken monkey" hypothesis for how humans developed a taste for alcohol.

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image: Falling Out of the Family Tree

Falling Out of the Family Tree

By Jef Akst | March 1, 2015

A mutation in an ethanol-metabolizing enzyme arose around the time that arboreal primates shifted to a more terrestrial lifestyle, perhaps as an adaptation to eating fermented fruit.

1 Comment

image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By Ruth Williams | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

7 Comments

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