The Scientist

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image: Control ALT, Delete Cancer

Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By Haroldo Silva, David Halvorsen, and Jeremy D. Henson | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

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image: In Custody

In Custody

By Wudan Yan | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

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image: Professional Marksman

Professional Marksman

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 1, 2015

Charles Sawyers, who began his research career just as the genetic details of human oncogenes were emerging, codeveloped Gleevec, the quintessential targeted cancer therapy.


image: The CAR T-Cell Race

The CAR T-Cell Race

By Vicki Brower | April 1, 2015

Tumor-targeting T-cell therapies are generating remarkable remissions in hard-to-beat cancers—and attracting millions of dollars of investment along the way.


image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By Adam Marcus | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

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image: Through a Spider’s Eyes

Through a Spider’s Eyes

By Brittany Taylor | April 1, 2015

Deciphering how a jumping spider sees the world and processes visual information may yield insights into long-standing robotics problems.


image: To Each His Own

To Each His Own

By Mary Beth Aberlin | April 1, 2015

Cancer treatment becomes more and more personal.


image: My Mighty Mouse

My Mighty Mouse

By Megan Scudellari | April 1, 2015

Personal drug regimens based on xenograft mice harboring a single patient’s tumor still need to prove their true utility in medicine.

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image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By George Klein | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.


image: Pain and Itch Neurons Found

Pain and Itch Neurons Found

By Kerry Grens | March 31, 2015

Inhibitory nerve cells in the spinal cord stop the transmission of pain and itch signals in mice.


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