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image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By Jef Akst | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity


image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By Sabrina Richards | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.


image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By Kate Yandell | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

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image: Bird Bullies

Bird Bullies

By Jef Akst | June 1, 2013

Regular supplies of food for scavenger birds in Spain may not be the most effective conservation strategy, as smaller birds are bullied away.

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image: Loss of Potential

Loss of Potential

By Dan Cossins | June 1, 2013

In the fruit fly, the ability of neural stem cells to make the full repertoire of neurons is regulated by the movement of key genes to the nuclear periphery.


image: Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

By Kerry Grens | June 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia. Age: 34

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image: Salamander Evolution

Salamander Evolution

By Dan Cossins | June 1, 2013

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.


image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By Bob Grant | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.


image: Ladybird Bioterrorists

Ladybird Bioterrorists

By Ruth Williams | May 16, 2013

The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.


image: Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

By Dan Cossins | May 14, 2013

Symbiotic fungi on the roots of bean plants can act as an underground signaling network, transmitting early warnings of impending aphid attacks.  

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