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Brain Cells Self-Amplify

By Jef Akst | July 5, 2011

A certain type of neural precursor does it all—replaces itself, differentiates into specialized brain cells, and multiplies into more stem-cell-like cells.

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image: Pain-Free Love

Pain-Free Love

By Jef Akst | July 1, 2011

Love can buffer people from pain by invoking feelings of safety and reassurance.

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image: The Birth of Optogenetics

The Birth of Optogenetics

By Edward S. Boyden | July 1, 2011

An account of the path to realizing tools for controlling brain circuits with light.

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image: OPSINS: Tools of the trade

OPSINS: Tools of the trade

By Edward S. Boyden | July 1, 2011

The optogenetic toolset is composed of genetically encoded molecules that, when targeted to specific neurons in the brain, enable the electrical activity of those neurons to be driven or silenced by light. 

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image: For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls

By Cristina Luiggi | July 1, 2011

Eleanor Simpson on how dopamine helps rats learn and may lead humans to addiction.

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image: Best in Academia, 2011

Best in Academia, 2011

By The Scientist Staff | July 1, 2011

Meet some of the finalists of this year's Best Places to Work in Academia survey. 

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Foresight

By Karen Hopkin | July 1, 2011

Studying the earliest events in visual development, Carla Shatz has learned the importance of looking at one’s data with open eyes—and an open mind.

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image: Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

By Edward S. Boyden | July 1, 2011

This animation illustrates optogenetics—a radical new technology for controlling brain activity with light. 

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image: Sleep on it

Sleep on it

By Megan Scudellari | June 23, 2011

Scientists invent a method to control the timing and duration of sleep in fruit flies and find that snoozing helps form long-term memories.

9 Comments

image: Summit Science

Summit Science

By Alison Snyder | June 20, 2011

Researchers seeking a link between vision problems and the dangerous physiological effects of hypoxia in mountain climbers are taking their work to new heights.

6 Comments

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