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image: The Eye of the Finch

The Eye of the Finch

By Andrew Dobson | August 1, 2013

Beaks did it for Darwin. Now, monitoring real-time evolution of bacteria that infects finch eyes reveals repeated, rapid evolution of an emerging avian pathogen in backyards throughout the U.S.


image: The Roots of Monogamy

The Roots of Monogamy

By Dan Cossins | July 31, 2013

A new analysis suggests that infanticide drove the evolution of pair living in some primate species, though another study reaches a different conclusion.


image: Keeping Up with Climate Change

Keeping Up with Climate Change

By Kate Yandell | July 24, 2013

In order to adapt to this century’s changing temperatures, vertebrates will need to evolve much faster than in previous eras.


image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By Sabrina Richards | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.


image: A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

By Dan Cossins | July 18, 2013

The discovery of a new species of horned dinosaur supports the idea that similar but separate species evolved on the same landmass thanks to a natural barrier.  

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image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By Dan Cossins | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.


image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By Dan Cossins | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.


image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By Joshua S. Weitz and Steven W. Wilhelm | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.


image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By Joshua S. Weitz and Steven W. Wilhelm | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.


image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By Cristina Luiggi | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.


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