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image: Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

By Abby Olena | December 19, 2017

Syrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel. 

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image: Image of the Day: Hunter Platelets 

Image of the Day: Hunter Platelets 

By The Scientist Staff | December 19, 2017

Researchers explore how blood platelets sweep bacteria into aggregate bundles at sites of infection to help phagocytic cells dispose of them. 

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image: Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

By The Scientist Staff | December 18, 2017

Entomologists have rediscovered a species of moth that was considered lost for 130 years. 

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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By Kerry Grens | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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image: Image of the Day: Tissue Feast

Image of the Day: Tissue Feast

By The Scientist Staff | December 5, 2017

Researchers are taking a close look at the bacterium that causes listeriosis disease.  

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image: Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

By The Scientist Staff | December 4, 2017

Factors such as humidity and temperature can affect how Rhinolophus clivosus use echolocation. 

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image: Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

By Ignacio Amigo | December 1, 2017

Brazilian researchers report a relatively large diversity of fungi in marine ecosystems surrounding Antarctica, but warn that climate change could bring unpleasant surprises.

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Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.

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The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researcher’s work will help predict how the Arctic is responding to climate change—and the global effects of those changes.

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