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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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image: Holding Their Ground

Holding Their Ground

By | February 1, 2016

To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

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image: Plant Immunity

Plant Immunity

By | February 1, 2016

How plants fight off pathogens

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image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 

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image: Cross-Reactive Ebola Antibodies

Cross-Reactive Ebola Antibodies

By | January 21, 2016

Human monoclonal antibodies induced during Ebola infection are able to neutralize related viral species, scientists show. 

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image: Planning for the Next Ebola Outbreak

Planning for the Next Ebola Outbreak

By | January 20, 2016

A public-health nonprofit and an international drugmaker team up to stockpile hundreds of thousands of doses of a promising vaccine and to speed along the approval process.

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image: Nutrient-Control for GM Bacteria

Nutrient-Control for GM Bacteria

By | January 20, 2016

Genetically modified bacteria that don’t survive unless given an unnatural amino acid could serve as a new control measure to protect wild organisms and ecosystems against accidental release. 

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image: Disclosure of Problematic Scopes Delayed: Report

Disclosure of Problematic Scopes Delayed: Report

By | January 14, 2016

The US Senate has found hospitals, a device maker, and federal regulators dragged their feet on reporting contaminated endoscopes.

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image: Cord Blood Cells Foretell Food Allergy

Cord Blood Cells Foretell Food Allergy

By | January 13, 2016

Scientists link an immune phenotype present at birth to the development of food allergies a year later.

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