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image: BPTW: By The Numbers

BPTW: By The Numbers

By The Scientist Staff | June 1, 2013

Take a closer look at some of the statistics generated by The Scientist's Best Place to Work Industry 2013 survey.


image: Defending Against Plagiarism

Defending Against Plagiarism

By Jonathan Bailey | June 1, 2013

Publishers need to be proactive about detecting and deterring copied text.


image: Making Good on Research

Making Good on Research

By Beth Marie Mole | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing nations who engage in capacity building find it bolsters the lives of locals and their own work.


image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By Richard Smith and Tracey Koehlmoos | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.


image: Oral History

Oral History

By Dan Cossins | June 1, 2013

Researchers use DNA from ancient tooth tartar to chart changes in the bacterial communities that have lived in human mouths for 8,000 years.

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image: Best Places to Work Industry 2013

Best Places to Work Industry 2013

By The Scientist Staff | June 1, 2013

Our final survey of the life-science industry workplace highlights the companies—small and large, domestic and international—that are making their researchers feel valued and at home.


image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By Beth Marie Mole | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.


image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By Dan Cossins | May 23, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Vitamin C Slays TB Bacteria

Vitamin C Slays TB Bacteria

By Dan Cossins | May 21, 2013

The essential nutrient can kill drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by producing oxidative radicals that damage DNA.

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image: Decoding Bacterial Methylomes

Decoding Bacterial Methylomes

By Kate Yandell | May 15, 2013

A new technique could soon spur unprecedented insight into the role of bacterial epigenetics in the evolution of pathogen virulence.

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